Welcome to bricolagework.com


 


BRICOLEUR/ARTIST
INTUITION/IMAGERY CONSULTANT
COSMOLOGIST

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Established 9/26/2002

AARON LEE GIVAN, Ph.D.
Copyright. 2002. Aaron Givan.
All rights reserved.


(Updated 2-20-2009)


[e-teachingandlearning.biz]

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BRICOLEUR'S BAZAAR


Aaron Givan, Ph.D.
(Copyright. 1996. A. Givan. All rights reserved.)


This model for promoting the work of the bricoleur--building artifacts
from what ever is at hand--provides:

I. An analysis of one'e basic problem solving preferences.

II. An array of 16+ starting positions from which to approach the
development of professional/product interests.

III. Training in a succession of progressive steps that enables the bricolage process--that is, doing bricolagework.



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THE BUSINESS STYLE ANALYSIS PROTOCOL (BSAP)

Aaron Givan, Ph.D.
(Copyright. 2002, A. Givan. All rights reserved.)


This service provides:

I. An analysis of one's basic orientation to business.

II. A synthesis model of the business orientation of a specific work group.

III. Training experiences to promote professional/product
development.


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ORGANIC-NATURALISIC MODELING

AARON GIVAN, Ph.D.
(Copyright. 2005. Aaron Givan. All rights reserved.)


STRUCTURE AND DYNAMICS IN ORGANIZATIONS

One way to think about organizations and the functional modes necessary to make them operate is to use a naturalistic or organic approach--enough structure, like the skeleton system of the human body to support the organizational patterns [as imaged in an organizational chart by the entities named in the chart, for example] so they do not fall apart, but also, enough flexibility within the structure to allow for movement [as indicated by the connecting lines showing the relationships among the entities named within the chart]--rather like the muscle and ligaments of the human body.

The structure-dynamics relationship for human organizations can be modeled using a number of natural-organic examples from nature: for example, the leader-worker pattern in bee colonies or the various kinds of ant colonies that have been found. Individual gifts and preferences within humans can come close to the assigned functions of individual groups within these organic organizations; combining individual gifts can foster the completion of group interests/goals.

VARIABILITY

The added dimension for a human organization is the power of choice of the individuals within the structure--more rigid or more flexible, as the case may be--to work within the normal give-and-take ranges of the existing organization at any given moment. The introduction of a crisis/problem variable within the normal "activities of daily operation" (ADO) can solicit several kinds of response that demonstrate the power of individual choice:

1. Empirical needs assessment that is process and thing oriented: like a fire in an aircraft that needs immediate response by-the-numbers--rather like the larger guard ants standing guard over the workers as they do their work. In such an instance there is strong structure established by the SOP's for such situations and very defined, expected responses that still require the element of human choice.

2. Appreciative inquiry that is person and group oriented: this emphasizes the continuation of what is working and building on those elements. The group's awareness of its own functioning helps guide and facilitate the health and growth of the group with permissions and protections within the group for members to help one another define the operating rules as ADO functions are processed in the moment.


COMPOUND-COMPLEX OPERATIONS

For teaching purposes and purposes of analysis and model building, more simple elements are considered within any study of an organization--for example, models like management by walking around, theory X and theory Y, and the like.

One place to begin in such modeling studies is to understand the structure-behavior patterns within each individual within the organization; this can be done, for example, by using the MBTI type inventories suggested as part of this class and by keeping notebooks for the analysis of such patterns for the groups within which you work. A comparison of the findings from correlated studies of such notebook records can show suggestive models and ways of teaching and assessing ADO patterns.

At another level, rehearsing responses to the analyzed patterns as a group experience--talking it over together through whatever means--can allow for the more complex patterns that are present due to the power of choice and the need to maintain one's identity. How these dynamics work out becomes the acting operating dynamics in actual play in the moment.

At this point, the structure-dynamics dance among the players in the organization is compound and complex: compound in that the lines of movement within the named entities within the organizational chart have vibrancy--they are not static; complex in that the named entities are interacting in multiple ways with one another all at once at any given moment.

It's a wonder that a large organization can function at all; yet that is the beauty of human groups--they are compound-complex entities and, for me, living-organic creations...

FLEXIBILITY

Again, one way to think about organizations and the functional modes necessary to make them operate is to use a naturalistic approach--enough structure, like the skeleton system of the human body to support the organizational patterns [as imaged in an organizational chart by the entities named in the chart, for example] so they do not fall apart, but also, enough flexibility within the structure to allow for movement [as indicated by the connecting lines showing the relationships among the entities named within the chart]--rather like the muscle and ligaments of the human body.

The key for successful operations is the achievement of some kind of balance between the structure of an organization and the movements/dynamics within the structure...

Can you give examples of this balance and the tensions that go with it within your organization?

END (1-3-2008)


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DREAMING AS SEEING/PERCEIVING:
A KNOWLEDGE BUILDING MODEL

Aaron Lee Givan, Ph.D.
(Copyright. 2002. All rights reserrved.)


I. Types of Dreaming: Vivid, Lucid, Vision Quest

II. Dreams as Tools for Seeing/Reading the LANDSCAPE

III. Perceiving Internal/External Reality: The Dreaming Connections


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The Center For Environmental Management for Success

[An Intrapsychic-Ecological Approach]

[11/10/2003]

(Established 1982, Phoenix AZ)

KEY FOCUS:

Wholeness Within the Self as ART


ABSTRACT: Within the structures of everything are the elements of "living beauty": the key/secret to finding and participating in this living beauty is to look long and hard at "X"--in this case the self--so that you see/perceive/understand the structure and relationships of behaviors to the patterns of structures within--in this case, the self....AND make moment-to-moment small adjustments about the tasks of living using the whole self--reasoning AND feelings...Real, living beauty depends on this connection, the small decisons/adaptations, so that things are lived rightly, placed just right, or seen in the light of the larger WHOLE, the cosmos....

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EXPERT TOPICS FOR ONLINE CLASSES: 1/2004ff

Aaron Lee Givan, Ph. D.



The following topics are sample areas in which I have expertise [topics related directly to doctoral research studies]:

1. Qualitative Research Methods
2. Creativity
3. Learning Styles
4. Brain Studies
5. Test Anxiety—College Level
6. Lifelong Planning
7. Personal Growth Enhancement
8. Mentoring
9. Learning Strategies Management--
10. Non-Discursive Models of Learning
11. Story, Memoir
12. Social Construction of Knowledge
13. Artistic Problem Solving—Creative Problem Solving
14. Educational Foundations
15. Personal Life Planning
16. Work Environments
17. Groups
18. Wellness
19. Wellness Development
20. Personal Narrative

Any one, or a combination, of the above topics can be developed into an ONLINE class for 3 hours credit at the undergraduate or graduate—masters or doctoral--level.

CHOOSING A TOPIC-CLASS:

1. Choose a topic that interests you.
2. Structure, with the help of your mentor, a learning contract, syllabus, and appropriate study materials—text and/or articles. For a 3 hr class, include a 10 page research paper OR a field experience (requires a 5 page summary report/presentation).
For a one hr class: a five page paper OR short field experience with a 5 page report.

EVALUATION MECHANISMS:
1. Letter: S (Satisfactory)/U (Unsatisfactory) and/or
2. Rubrics’ critique of (A) Field Demo Presentation or (B) Portfolio.

CLASS SCHEDULING CYCLE:
Classes start as mutually arranged.

TUITION RATES:
Each certified/semester hour is $275.00/hour; that is, $275.00 for a one hour class, $825.00 for a 3 hour class.




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TRAINING IN APPLIED ETHICS—POLICIES AND PROCEDURES:
A MODEL (11/6/03)
Copyright. 2003. Aaron Givan, Ph.D. All rights reserved.

VISION STATEMENT: Be well! Do the right thing with beauty and meaning in mind.
MISSION STATEMENT: Use meta-ethics [ethics about ethics] to get people started in
the application of ethics in the tasks of living through flexible learning opportunities including transdisciplinary experiences within a two-level certification program and a masters in applied/professional ethics degree.
PROGRAM OBJECTIVES: The objectives of the Training in Applied Ethics Program are to:
1. Enable individuals to reason clearly in the tasks of living using applied ethics.
2. Familiarize people with the ethical knowledge, skills, and abilities (KSA’s) to enable personal and professional growth while contributing to the common good.
3. Encourage personal involvement and improvement, meaningful research, and intellectual achievement, in ethical problems at the individual, group, and global levels.
4. Promote lifelong appreciation for and learning about using applied ethics.
GENERIC TOPIC/CLASS DESCRIPTION: Applied ethics training classes emphasize principles of ethical development using appropriate ethical theories/models in real time situations and provide opportunities for developing a personalized approach with direct and immediate applications.
GENERIC COURSE GOALS:
1. Acquire a functional use of applied ethics concepts and practices.
2. Identify the constraints and extensions/refinements of applied ethics.
3. Explore, define and apply personal preferences for using applied ethics in specific situations.
4. Identify and refine one’s personal theory-model of applied ethics.
5. Discuss direct and immediate uses of applied ethics using feedback & critique mechanisms.
6. Identify personally beneficial options and possible implications for using applied ethics for personal and professional growth and lifelong learning.
7. Evaluate and act on new and refined learning in applied ethics.
TRAINING LEVELS:
1. Associate: Complete 1 certified hour of study for 16 weeks, 3 times per year for 2 years + 3 hr field project: total of 9 certified/equivalent semester hours transferrable to Master’s level.
2. Fellow: Complete 3 certified hours of study for 16 weeks, 3 times per year for two years +2 hr field project: total of 20 certified/equivalent semester hours transferrable to Master’s level.
3. Masters in Applied-Professional Ethics: Complete 3 semester hours of study for 16 weeks, 6 times per year for 3 years +2 hr field project each year for 3 years: total 60 semester hours.
Expected study time per certified/semester hour: 30 clock hours online-offline.
CHOOSING A TOPIC-CLASS:
1. Choose a topic that interests you for each 16 week study event from one of the three alternate topic-class lists that are attached (this is a 4 page document): pick a topic from each of the categories in rotation each year—(1) individual, (2) group, and (3) global.
2. Structure, with the help of your mentor, at the beginning of the 16 weeks a learning contract, syllabus, and appropriate study materials—text and/or articles. For a 3 hr class, include a 10 page research paper OR a field experience (requires a 5 page summary report/presentation).
For a 1 hr class, include a 5 page paper OR short field experience with a 5 page report.
EVALUATION MECHANISMS:
1. Letter: S (Satisfactory)/U (Unsatisfactory) and/or
2. Rubrics’ critique of (A) Field Demo Presentation or (B) Portfolio.
CLASS SCHEDULING CYCLE:
Classes start on the first Monday of each odd numbered month; that is, Jan., Mar., May, July, Sept., & Nov.
TUITION RATES:
Each certified/semester hour is $275.00/hour; that is, $275.00 for a one hour class, $825.00 for a 3 hour class.


Page 1 0f 5

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SELECTED TOPICS IN APPLIED ETHICS


[Number Code: Sample—1.1.1
1.x.x—The first number in the sequence identifies one of three possible alternative topic listings/cycles.
x.1.x—The second number in the sequence identifies the focus/emphasis on the topic from a particular perspective: 1—Individual, 2—Group, 3—Global.
x.x.1—The third number (1-12) identifies the number of the specific topic in that specific focus/emphasis.]


1.1.1—Values and Ethics
1.1.2—Affirmative Action
1.1.3—Glass Ceiling
1.1.4—Ethical Relativism
1.1.5—Ethics in Education
1.1.6—Computer Seizures
1.1.7—Male-Female Relationships
1.1.8—Medical Information
1.1.9—Ethical Training and Development for Business Cultures
1.1.10—Harassment
1.1.11—Women’s Rights in Reproduction
1.1.12—Tobacco Use and Advertising


1.2.1—Computer Virus
1.2.2—Random Drug Testing
1.2.3—Genetic Screening of Employees
1.2.4—Child Punishment/Discipline
1.2.5—Teaching and Learning
1.2.6—Minority Relations
1.2.7—Selective Health Care Delivery
1.2.8—Indigenous Resistence/Violence
1.2.9—Assisted Suicide for the Terminally Ill
1.2.10—People (Stakeholders) or Profits (Stockholders)
1.2.11—Legal Paternalism
1.2.12—Interracial Communities


1.3.1—Whistleblowing
1.3.2—Charitable Support of the Poor by the Fortunate
1.3.3—Copyright and Technology
1.3.4—Disabled People’s Rights
1.3.5—Genetically Modified Food
1.3.6—Bribery and International Business
1.3.7—Corporate Responsibility
1.3.8—Patriarchal Society, Civil Society and Global Development
1.3.9—National Identification Systems for Individuals
1.3.10—Environmental Pollution
1.3.11—Governmental Ethical Decline
1.3.12—Cultural Religious Values and Exclusivity in Global Development

Page 2 of 5
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SELECTED TOPICS IN APPLIED ETHICS


[Number Code: Sample—1.1.1
1.x.x—The first number in the sequence identifies one of three possible alternative topic listings/cycles.
x.1.x—The second number in the sequence identifies the focus/emphasis on the topic from a particular perspective: 1—Individual, 2—Group, 3—Global.
x.x.1—The third number (1-12) identifies the number of the specific topic in that specific focus/emphasis.]


2.1.1—Computers and Society
2.1.2—Privacy and Technology
2.1.3—Age of Moral Accountability
2.1.4—Gender Based Discrimination
2.1.5—Social Responsibility and Ethics in Management
2.1.6—Human Sterilization
2.1.7—Character Education
2.1.8—Racism/Racial Discrimination
2.1.9—Multicultural Ethics
2.1.10—Rape Victim Abortions
2.1.11—Adoption
2.1.12—Sexism


2.2.1—Hacking
2.2.2—Sexually Transmitted Diseases (STD’s)
2.2.3—Child Care/Abuse
2.2.4—Character Education Providers
2.2.5—Wage Parity
2.2.6—Single Parent Families
2.2.7—Medical Trials of New Drugs
2.2.8—Data Base Abuse
2.2.9—Hiring Quotas
2.2.10—Civil Disobedience
2.2.11—Seclusion of Women
2.2.12—Racial Abuse Restitution


2.3.1—Social Justice
2.3.2—Encryption and Secrecy
2.3.3—Practicing the Professions—Related Ethics
2.3.4—Profitability
2.3.5—Cloning Animals for Food Consumption
2.3.6—Acceptable Risk
2.3.7—Multinational Corporations (MNC’s)
2.3.8—Slavery
2.3.9—Global Ethical Responsibility
2.3.10—Human Rights
2.3.11—Global Labor Practices
2.3.12—Euthanasia

Page 3 of 5
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SELECTED TOPICS IN APPLIED ETHICS


[Number Code: Sample—1.1.1
1.x.x—The first number in the sequence identifies one of three possible alternative topic listings/cycles.
x.1.x—The second number in the sequence identifies the focus/emphasis on the topic from a particular perspective: 1—Individual, 2—Group, 3—Global.
x.x.1—The third number (1-12) identifies the number of the specific topic in that specific focus/emphasis.]


3.1.1—Ethics in Society
3.1.2—Contextual Roots of Ethics
3.1.3—Individual Ethics Decline
3.1.4—Equity in Disciplinary Penalties in the Work Place
3.1.5—Business Ethics
3.1.6—Surveillance
3.1.7—Deceptive Advertising
3.1.8—Sex and the Genders
3.1.9—Vocational Ethics for Professionals
3.1.10—Morality and Ethics
3.1.11—Reverse Discrimination
3.1.12—Ethnic Discrimination


3.2.1—Children and the Web
3.2.2—Social Security Number Use
3.2.3—Employee Monitoring at Work
3.2.4—Age Discrimination
3.2.5—Abortion On Demand
3.2.6—Suicide
3.2.7—Capital Punishment
3.2.8—Elder Care
3.2.9—Multiculturalism
3.2.10—Reparations for Ethnically Abused Groups
3.2.11—Moral Collapse of the Culture
3.2.12—Terrorism Used for Political Change


3.3.1—Email SPAM
3.3.2—Computer Software Testing
3.3.3—Sexual Equality and Family Structures
3.3.4—Law Enforcement Practices
3.3.5—Women’s Rights
3.3.6—Global Availability of Medicine
3.3.7—Pandemics
3.3.8—Economic Justice
3.3.9—Universal Ethics
3.3.10—Corporate Ethics Decline
3.3.11—International Business Ethics
3.3.12—Government Corruption and International Business

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10 BENEFITS WITHIN THE TAEPP PROGRAM


1. Emphasis on diversity of topics within each yearly cycle: includes individual, group, and global views of ethical problems.
2. Flexibility of training levels:
a. Initial: Associate (9 hours towards Masters)
Fellow (20 hours towards Masters)
b. Secondary:
Masters (60 hour)
Diplomat (Two 2-hour field projects—one per year: post masters)
3. Customization/Personalization: student choice of topic-classes: recycled with each new class as learning levels within the program advance.
4. Negotiated learning contract, syllabus, and learning materials within each class.
5. Choice of research formats for project: Written paper or field project with report/demo/portfolio.
6. Multiple Evaluation Options: Letter—Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory (S/U); Rubrics for Field Demo/Portfolio
7. Final Presentation for Synthesis in each class: Proctored written essay experience OR orals via phone in front of a proctor.
8. One separate field project per year at site participant’s choosing: this capstone experience can personalize the year’s learnings.
9. Multiple staring times per year—every two month’s.
10. Reasonable Tuition for the diversity/flexibility of learnings offered.

Page 5 of 5
END

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SEE ALSO:
e-teachingandlearning.biz
adjunctaarongivan.info
ethicsclasses.com
appliedethics.us
churchman.net
writingsbyaaron.com
bricolagework.com
metavoicesystems.com
professionaldevelopmentinstitue.biz
artbyaaron.com
teachingandlearning.us
e-teachingandlearning.org
colorsforliving.com
bricolageworks.com
dreamanalysis.us
center4.org

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